tracking is an anticipatory form of seeing
This blog serves as an online deposit for images and interesting bits/ideas for t s Beall, an artist based in Glasgow.
tracking is an anticipatory form of seeing
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Little is known about the hundreds of families who rely on the travelling shows for their livelihood and the mounting problems they are said to face with every passing year.

A reduction in the number of available sites for fairgrounds, growing red tape, protests from hostile communities and the growth of new technology offering alternative forms of entertainment is said to have left the next generation of fairground operators seeking alternative employment.
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THERE are believed to be at least 20,000 active showmen families in the UK - but as little as a 10th of them are thought to make a living in Scotland now.

When First Minister Alex Salmond hosted an official reception for Scotland’s showpeople in 2009 there were 450 members of the Scottish Showmen’s Guild, representing around 2000 families who had been entertaining the public for decades. That number has now slumped to just over 350 members.

At the time The First Minister said: “Travelling showpeople are an important part of Scotland’s culture, history and economy and combine a strong tradition of family and community with a high level of entrepreneurship and business acumen.”

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Film maker explores Scotland’s fairground families - The Scotsman
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(via Buffalo Bill memorabilia up for grabs at auction in Cincinnati - Omaha.com)

NORTH PLATTE, Neb. — A collection of historical items with ties to North Platte will be sold at auction later this month.

Among other things, the memorabilia include approximately 600 photographs, a hat, a poster and a film reel that once belonged to William F. “Buffalo Bill” Cody.

“It’s the largest collection of personal family photographs of Buffalo Bill ever to come to the auction block,” said Evan Sikes, marketing and communications director for Cowan’s Auctions Inc. “It was brought to our attention about a year ago. We eventually got it.”

According to Sikes, the items were offered by Cody’s great-granddaughter, Patricia “Patsy” Ann Garlow. Sikes tracked the family lineage for verification purposes before the items were listed for sale.

He confirmed that the memorabilia were originally Cody’s and that they were passed down through the family.

The collection was loaned to the Buffalo Bill Historical Center in Cody, Wyo., in the 1960s. It remained there until the family took it back in the late 1990s.

A family album containing 301 photographs will be one of the featured items up for grabs. Sikes said it includes professional portraits of Cody’s family in addition to images of the Wild West show and Western scenery. The estimated value is $8,000 to $10,000.

“That will be sold as a whole, but many of the other photographs will be divided into lots,” Sikes said. “For example, if we have two photos that are similar, we will put them together. There will be 213 lots total.”

Many of the pictures are of Cody in North Platte. There are also some of him in Bath, England, and at the foot of Mount Vesuvius in Naples, Italy.

In other photographs, Cody can be seen with the prince of Monaco in Wyoming and meeting the shah of Persia in Vichy, France, in 1905.

Two of the last pictures ever taken of Cody will be available.

One was shot five days before his death on Jan. 10, 1917.

The other is of Cody with his doctor at Glenwood Springs, Colo.

“It’s tough to say what the value of the entire collection will be,” Sikes said.

“It just depends on who you have out there bidding.”

The auction is scheduled for Jan. 31 in Cincinnati.

Sikes said those unable to attend in person can bid absentee, via the phone or online.
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Rare photographs of Buffalo Bill Cody’s tour of Scotland 110 YEARS AGO up for auction with images of Old West legend expected to fetch thousands

William F. Cody toured Scotland for three months as part of his tour
Buffalo Bill and his Indians and Rough Riders visited to Dundee
Had a three month residency at a Glasgow showground in 1892
In 1904 he did visited 29 towns and cities across Scotland
Auction estimate for each of the seven Scottish photographs is £360-£480
By DAILY MAIL REPORTER 
PUBLISHED: 23 January 2014 

Rare photos of Buffalo Bill Cody’s Wild West Show taken during his legendary tour of Scotland over a century ago are to be sold at auction. The showman and his team left the U.S. twice to visit Scotland - one of the photos shows Buffalo Bill and his real cowboys and cowgirls during their visit to Dundee in 1904. The show, which wowed crowds with cowboys, horses and Native Indians, had a highly successful three month residency at a Glasgow showground in 1892, followed by a Scottish wide tour in 1904 when they travelled by train to 29 towns and cities across Scotland.
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This project from 2011-12 is one that I still reference and think about often, and subsequent work/s that I’ve initiated in Govan have built on ground that this project prepared, and partnerships that were forged here. So -much credit should be given to them, even 2 years on…

The image on the bus depicts what Gehan MacLeod from the GalGael Trust called ‘tour karaoke’. Brilliant:

Govan Thegither Version 2Community broadsheet illustrating the year long climate challenge funded culture change project ‘Govan Together’
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(via The Drouth - Editorial - LINGERING WITH INTENT)
LINGERING WITH INTENT

Issue 46: INTENTION
Issue 46 goes in search of the prime movers, the string pullers and the eminence gris of our times. Whatever Barthes might say, the way and means by which we enforce our will upon the universe still matters, and the author ain’t dead yet…
Our cover artist, Tara Beall, provides testimony from an ecelctic series of socially engaged, grass roots  art practices that helpfully amends an old slogan to the more timely 'Nothing About Us, Without Us, is For Us.’ Guest Editor James Clegg of Edinburgh’s Talbot Rice gallery interrogates the intentions of the contemporary artist, and provides a useful overview of the issue as a whole…
Blair’s award for Govan dry dock design - Entertainment - Donside Piper and Herald
Occupy Museums
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As the commercial art world in America rides a boom unlike any it has ever experienced, another kind of art world growing rapidly in its shadows is beginning to assert itself. And art institutions around the country are grappling with how to bring it within museum walls and make the case that it can be appreciated along with paintings, sculpture and other more tangible works.

Known primarily as social practice, its practitioners freely blur the lines among object making, performance, political activism, community organizing, environmentalism and investigative journalism, creating a deeply participatory art that often flourishes outside the gallery and museum system. And in so doing, they push an old question — “Why is it art?” — as close to the breaking point as contemporary art ever has.

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Outside the Citadel, Social Practice Art Is Intended to Nurture - NYTimes.com
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momatalks:

Can art be a form of research? Can research be a type of art? 
By merging these two seemingly incongruous fields, the practice known as artistic research raises these key questions. However, while this approach is increasingly prevalent in contemporary art, its parameters are largely undefined. In contrast to forms of academic or scientific research—which encompass a clear thesis, a precise method for collecting data or supporting evidence, and detailed results—the pursuit of artistic research allows for open-ended aims and processes.
To open up a conversation on the creative potential of sustained investigation, MoMA Talks is holding an “Artistic Research Science Fair” on Thursday, April 18 from 12:30-2:00 p.m. This lunchtime program, hosted by historian and Cabinet magazine editor D. Graham Burnett, features four practicing research-artists—Sal Randolph, Steve Rowell, Brooke Singer, and Alexandra P. Spaudling. The artists will take on the challenge of sharing their own creative practices in the classic form of a science fair; each of them will set up a presentation board outlining their questions, methods, and findings. These boards will serve as a launching point not only to learn about the artists’ projects, but also to consider the potential incongruity between the artistic content and the uniform frameworks of traditional research practices.
Reserve your free ticket today and join us on April 18 to meet and interact with artists and explore the intersection of precise knowledge and infinite possibility! If you can’t attend the program in person, be sure to tune in to the live Tweeting on @MoMATalks.
momatalks:

Can art be a form of research? Can research be a type of art? 
By merging these two seemingly incongruous fields, the practice known as artistic research raises these key questions. However, while this approach is increasingly prevalent in contemporary art, its parameters are largely undefined. In contrast to forms of academic or scientific research—which encompass a clear thesis, a precise method for collecting data or supporting evidence, and detailed results—the pursuit of artistic research allows for open-ended aims and processes.
To open up a conversation on the creative potential of sustained investigation, MoMA Talks is holding an “Artistic Research Science Fair” on Thursday, April 18 from 12:30-2:00 p.m. This lunchtime program, hosted by historian and Cabinet magazine editor D. Graham Burnett, features four practicing research-artists—Sal Randolph, Steve Rowell, Brooke Singer, and Alexandra P. Spaudling. The artists will take on the challenge of sharing their own creative practices in the classic form of a science fair; each of them will set up a presentation board outlining their questions, methods, and findings. These boards will serve as a launching point not only to learn about the artists’ projects, but also to consider the potential incongruity between the artistic content and the uniform frameworks of traditional research practices.
Reserve your free ticket today and join us on April 18 to meet and interact with artists and explore the intersection of precise knowledge and infinite possibility! If you can’t attend the program in person, be sure to tune in to the live Tweeting on @MoMATalks.
momatalks:

Can art be a form of research? Can research be a type of art? 
By merging these two seemingly incongruous fields, the practice known as artistic research raises these key questions. However, while this approach is increasingly prevalent in contemporary art, its parameters are largely undefined. In contrast to forms of academic or scientific research—which encompass a clear thesis, a precise method for collecting data or supporting evidence, and detailed results—the pursuit of artistic research allows for open-ended aims and processes.
To open up a conversation on the creative potential of sustained investigation, MoMA Talks is holding an “Artistic Research Science Fair” on Thursday, April 18 from 12:30-2:00 p.m. This lunchtime program, hosted by historian and Cabinet magazine editor D. Graham Burnett, features four practicing research-artists—Sal Randolph, Steve Rowell, Brooke Singer, and Alexandra P. Spaudling. The artists will take on the challenge of sharing their own creative practices in the classic form of a science fair; each of them will set up a presentation board outlining their questions, methods, and findings. These boards will serve as a launching point not only to learn about the artists’ projects, but also to consider the potential incongruity between the artistic content and the uniform frameworks of traditional research practices.
Reserve your free ticket today and join us on April 18 to meet and interact with artists and explore the intersection of precise knowledge and infinite possibility! If you can’t attend the program in person, be sure to tune in to the live Tweeting on @MoMATalks.
momatalks:

Can art be a form of research? Can research be a type of art? 
By merging these two seemingly incongruous fields, the practice known as artistic research raises these key questions. However, while this approach is increasingly prevalent in contemporary art, its parameters are largely undefined. In contrast to forms of academic or scientific research—which encompass a clear thesis, a precise method for collecting data or supporting evidence, and detailed results—the pursuit of artistic research allows for open-ended aims and processes.
To open up a conversation on the creative potential of sustained investigation, MoMA Talks is holding an “Artistic Research Science Fair” on Thursday, April 18 from 12:30-2:00 p.m. This lunchtime program, hosted by historian and Cabinet magazine editor D. Graham Burnett, features four practicing research-artists—Sal Randolph, Steve Rowell, Brooke Singer, and Alexandra P. Spaudling. The artists will take on the challenge of sharing their own creative practices in the classic form of a science fair; each of them will set up a presentation board outlining their questions, methods, and findings. These boards will serve as a launching point not only to learn about the artists’ projects, but also to consider the potential incongruity between the artistic content and the uniform frameworks of traditional research practices.
Reserve your free ticket today and join us on April 18 to meet and interact with artists and explore the intersection of precise knowledge and infinite possibility! If you can’t attend the program in person, be sure to tune in to the live Tweeting on @MoMATalks.
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yep.
alexpaik:

Michael Scoggins @ Freight and Volume
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"Dazzle camouflage (also known as Razzle Dazzle or Dazzle painting) was a military camouflage paint scheme used on ships, extensively during World War I and to a lesser extent in World War II. The idea is credited to the artist Norman Wilkinson who was serving in the Royal Naval Volunteer Reserve when he had the idea in 1917. After the Allied Navies failed to develop effective means to disguise ships in all weathers, the dazzle technique was employed, not in order to conceal the ship, but rather to make it difficult for the enemy to estimate its type, size, speed and direction of travel. After seeing a canon painted in dazzle camouflage trundling through the streets of Paris, Picasso is reported to have taken credit for the innovation which seemed to him a quintessentially Cubist technique."
Dazzle Ships | The Public Domain Review
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Inspiring me not to give up on academic publishing:
“We welcome papers which are challenging, which exhibit a will to not only interpret but also transform the world. Antipode papers are rigorous and intellectually substantive, they wrestle with debates in geography and take them forward. But they also go well beyond geography, trespassing and disrupting disciplinary borders. They are original, but not just original: they want to be significant to theory and practice. They are argumentative, scholarly and clear, able to withstand the trials and tribulations of peer review; but they are also alive, animated, and compelling to read. In many instances they ooze political fervour, but they may do this in different ways, not just through angry rhetoric or savage polemic (although these are forms of radical writing which we also acknowledge and cherish). Antipode papers can be – perhaps even should be – collaborative and cooperative. They are not despairing. They are hopeful but not naively so. They are often normative, probing ‘what ought to be’ rather than just ‘what is’: in this sense, they may be explanatory-diagnostic but also anticipatory-utopian. They may interrogate wider structural logics but also be based in lived experiences. And – did we already say this? – they are passionate! Like many who opt for academia, we are driven and motivated; have a fastidiousness for detail; love of language and a clearly delivered thesis; and ardor for the unexpected. Antipode is for us, above all, about passion: passionate writing informed by a passion for justice, in the service of liberation rather than salvation. The quest is not for transcendent Truth but for historical truths that we can confront or enact (as the case may be). Antipode papers are timely, they resonate, speak to, or in some way help us understand – in order to change – existing forms of domination. They generate new, practical ideas for radical politics, broadly defined.” (via A Radical Journal of Geography | AntipodeFoundation.org)
Nights in this City - Forced Entertainment...